Greetings composers! 

We're looking for two fanfares for our upcoming Third Annual Gratitude Concert in Chapel Hill, NC.   Here are the guidelines for these fanfares:

  • Must be approximately 1 minute long
  • Must be for solo French Horn or solo Vienna Horn
  • Must be celebratory and attention getting! 

Please submit your entry as a reply to this thread, and upload the following files:

  • A .pdf file of the score is required
  • An .mp3 file is optional.  
  • Deadline for submission is Wednesday February 13, 2013, 4 pm EST. 

The chosen fanfares will be used at our concerts as:

  • Opening fanfare to announce that the concert is about to start
  • After intermission fanfare to announce that the second half is about to start

There will be a professional video made of this concert and the composer of the fanfares will receive a copy of the video, plus have his/her name in the program and in the online writeup of the concert.   All participants will also get a detailed feedback on their piece by horn players, advanced composition students, and teachers.

The upcoming concert is Saturday February 16th, 6 pm Third Annual Gratitude Concert

Good luck!

Harmonia Composition Studio

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Greetings all fanfare composers!

I just heard from Andrew McAfee, the wonderful horn player and professor whose students are reviewing your fanfares.  We should be getting feedback very soon, in fact he mentioned that his students would be recording the fanfares!  I'll find out more from him on this exciting possibility and keep all of you posted.

-- Julie

How cool is that!?!

The feedback from Andrew McAfee's horn studio is starting to come in.  I'll post comments and recordings as I receive them!

And Let Rich Music's Tongue Unfold
David Stowell, Composer

The fanfare is written in an excellent key, especially with the arpeggiated calls
being in the open B-flat horn. The range is also good- not just sitting in the high
range, but still showing off some high B-flats. It would be fun to have some lower
pedal notes too though to add even more variety.


I like the variations made on the melody, especially with the stopped call and
response sections. My only issue with the melody was when I was coming up
with musical phrasings/arrival points, I was a little unsure with what to do with m.
16-18, as I was hearing m. 18 as an arrival point. In order to better set up this
arrival point, lengthening the trill and thus shortening the half note in m. 16 might
help do this. I also felt that in m. 40 I naturally wanted to trill a little longer in
order to arrive at the written F.


Overall this is very well written for the horn and fun to play/listen to. I especially
like the sound of the written c-sharp/d-flats in m. 35 and 49. Nice work!

-- Lauren Anderson, Horn player

Here is the recording of "And Let Rich Music's Tongue Unfold"

Attachments:

Comments from another of the horn players:

Michael Tauben ("Adverto for Horn"):

Generally stopped horn is denoted with a plus sign over the individual notes that you want stopped OR you write "gestoptf" or "gest." Writing "stopped" isn't wrong, but those are more common (writing "open" in English is acceptable). Also the D-F# major 10th leap in measure 8, while cool is difficult to execute consistently. Generally, avoid leaps of over an octave unless you really want/need to. But it's doable for sure. I thought the A# after the high F# was a little strange on my ear, which also makes that lick difficult to pull off. Overall I found this piece very interesting, challenging, yet fun to play!

Noah Balamucki ("Cowboys and Contenders"):

The mixed meters were fun, I liked the dominant 7th in measure 2 (very common, characteristic thing to play). In measure 5 (and maybe this is just an issue with whatever program you were using to write this), if the tied 8ths could become quarters that would be easier to read. Everything was very doable and easy technically speaking.

Timothy J. Marko ("Triton's Wreathed Horn"):

I love triplets, don't get me wrong. However, in measure 16 particularly, I found it difficult to execute the sixteenth-note triplets at that speed. It was much easier when the triplets were strictly arpeggios or step-wise motion. Whenever I see fast notes, I generally anticipate scales or arpeggiations, and those are much easier to execute technically than the weird in-between thing in that measure. I really liked the piece overall though, especially the ending!

Gavin Brown ("French Horn Fanfare"):

Good ideas, however, the low G-F# leap that occurs in measure 12 and 14 is a little bit awkward. Also, I would really appreciate if the high C figure at the end of measure 20 wasn't immediately followed by a D nearly two octaves below. In a real-world situation, the eighth note D would be cut as the player breathed/adjusted his or her embouchure. So either picking a note a little closer to the C right after the C, or adding in a rest, because the player will in most cases anyway.

Hope this helps!

-- Emily Farmer

Hi Emily,

Thank you very much for taking time to send your feedback. Much appreciated and your comments are duly noted.

:)

Michael

Julie Harris said:

Comments from another of the horn players:

Michael Tauben ("Adverto for Horn"):

Generally stopped horn is denoted with a plus sign over the individual notes that you want stopped OR you write "gestoptf" or "gest." Writing "stopped" isn't wrong, but those are more common (writing "open" in English is acceptable). Also the D-F# major 10th leap in measure 8, while cool is difficult to execute consistently. Generally, avoid leaps of over an octave unless you really want/need to. But it's doable for sure. I thought the A# after the high F# was a little strange on my ear, which also makes that lick difficult to pull off. Overall I found this piece very interesting, challenging, yet fun to play!

Noah Balamucki ("Cowboys and Contenders"):

The mixed meters were fun, I liked the dominant 7th in measure 2 (very common, characteristic thing to play). In measure 5 (and maybe this is just an issue with whatever program you were using to write this), if the tied 8ths could become quarters that would be easier to read. Everything was very doable and easy technically speaking.

Timothy J. Marko ("Triton's Wreathed Horn"):

I love triplets, don't get me wrong. However, in measure 16 particularly, I found it difficult to execute the sixteenth-note triplets at that speed. It was much easier when the triplets were strictly arpeggios or step-wise motion. Whenever I see fast notes, I generally anticipate scales or arpeggiations, and those are much easier to execute technically than the weird in-between thing in that measure. I really liked the piece overall though, especially the ending!

Gavin Brown ("French Horn Fanfare"):

Good ideas, however, the low G-F# leap that occurs in measure 12 and 14 is a little bit awkward. Also, I would really appreciate if the high C figure at the end of measure 20 wasn't immediately followed by a D nearly two octaves below. In a real-world situation, the eighth note D would be cut as the player breathed/adjusted his or her embouchure. So either picking a note a little closer to the C right after the C, or adding in a rest, because the player will in most cases anyway.

Hope this helps!

-- Emily Farmer

Thank you, Emily. I've replaced the tied eighths with quarter notes--it even looks more natural. Very helpful; always glad to get feedback from a player!


Noah Balamucki ("Cowboys and Contenders"):

The mixed meters were fun, I liked the dominant 7th in measure 2 (very common, characteristic thing to play). In measure 5 (and maybe this is just an issue with whatever program you were using to write this), if the tied 8ths could become quarters that would be easier to read. Everything was very doable and easy technically speaking.

 

Thanks for the feedback Emily.  It's great to get feedback from someone who's actually played the piece.

I tried to sneak in the V7 in that measure and didn't think about what I did to the to the flow from a player perspective. 

Thanks for helping me and the others.

Tim

 

Timothy J. Marko ("Triton's Wreathed Horn"):

I love triplets, don't get me wrong. However, in measure 16 particularly, I found it difficult to execute the sixteenth-note triplets at that speed. It was much easier when the triplets were strictly arpeggios or step-wise motion. Whenever I see fast notes, I generally anticipate scales or arpeggiations, and those are much easier to execute technically than the weird in-between thing in that measure. I really liked the piece overall though, especially the ending!

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